Archive for the ‘Easter’ Category

Happy Easter!

March 23, 2008

Our boy decorated bunny cake

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The Bunny Cake cutting diagram

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Bunny Egg Holder

March 21, 2008

I though these would make cute place-cards or table decorations

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Download bunny-egg-holder.pdf

Print on colored card-stock and cut out on dotted line.

Bring legs up then wrap one arm in front of legs and then bring the other arm around and place on top of the first arm. Staple where claws on bunny should be.

Want more bunnies? Check out Bunny Napkin Rings

Bunny Napkin Ring

March 21, 2008

Here’s a little something for the children’s table at Easter —- a bunny napkin ring.

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Download bunny-napkin-ring.pdf

Print on colored card-stock then cut out. Roll end toward back of bunny head.

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Staple where claws on bunny should be

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I wrapped silverware in an orange napkin then fastened with a green pipe cleaner and slipped the “carrot” into the bunny.  If you have a hard time with the bunny standing up, a cotton ball glued to the back would provide stability and be a cute addition.

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You will find a matching Bunny Egg holder here.

Window Silhouettes

March 6, 2008

We had so much fun making these window clings —–the possibilities for seasonal and everyday decorations are endless.

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You will need a roll of clear contact paper, paint brushes, paint (we used acrylic), fine sandpaper and masking tape.

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First cut a piece of contact paper from the roll. I cut squares about 5″ x 5″ because that was about the size of shapes I knew I would be cutting.

Take a fine piece of sandpaper and lightly sand the shiny surface of the contact paper where you will be painting. Wipe off any dust. This step helps the paint adhere to the slick contact paper.

Since we are often VERY messy when we paint I taped a piece of wax paper to the table. Tape the piece of contact paper shiny(sanded) side up onto the wax paper.

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Paint onto the contact paper square. Since my daughter is three I encouraged her to paint using lots of colors. I knew I would be cutting out Easter eggs so it really didn’t matter what or how she painted.

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Allow the painting to dry completely. I think she painted about 10 of these squares.

Once the paint is completely dry take another square of contact paper the same size as your painting and peel off the paper backing. Cover your painting with the clear contact paper. Smooth out any bubbles.

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Trace around any shape of your choosing. I used an egg and bunny for my template.

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Cut out the shape

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Carefully remove the paper backing. This takes some time —–make sure you are only removing the paper (the back of your painting should be sticky). If you use acrylic paint it is plastic enough that it has a tendency to peel away from the contact paper, so peel carefully! If it does peel away and it won’t stick back down just put a little glue stick between the layers.

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Once you are finished stick your silhouettes to your window

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from the outside looking in

from the inside looking out

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I would encourage older kids to paint their own designs and then cut out. I can imagine huge flowers and birds! Nothing is sweeter than kid’s art!

Have fun!!

From my nest to yours

April 4, 2007

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This is my last minute solution for simple Easter table decorations. I purchase mini grapevine wreaths, bundled in a 6 pack, from the craft store. They are really inexpensive and can be found even cheaper this week at Hobby Lobby—-50% off! (I used the same wreaths for the chalkboard eggs.)

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Fill the center of each wreath with Easter grass and then a few foil wrapped chocolate eggs. I place one nest in the center of each guest’s plate.

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Bon Appetit!

Please eat your vegetables!

March 27, 2007

My friend, Shelly, made cute carrots like these years ago and I have never forgotten them. Such a simple treat. The bag is a disposable cake decorating bag. Not all brands of these bags are created equal so make sure you are buying clear ones. Fill the bag with cheese curls, puffs or balls and then tie with green ribbon.

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I am off for a few days with my husband. See you next week!

Chalkboard Easter Eggs

March 23, 2007

I was totally inspired to see Martha make her own chalkboard paint. This could be the start to limitless crafts. I already loved chalkboard paint, but to have colors—wow. I think these chalkboard painted eggs would be unique place-cards for Easter dinner or just fun for kids to decorate over and over again with chalk. I used wooden eggs but you could also use blown-out real ones. They might be fragile when decorating, so I would probably fill them with plaster to make them more sturdy.

You will need:

Eggs, Acrylic or Latex Paint, Primer, Non-Sanded White Grout, 220-150 Sandpaper, Foam Paint Brushes and something to mix the paint in.

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I first gave my eggs a coat of primer

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I then mixed 1/4 cup of acrylic paint with 1 1/2 teaspoons of non-sanded grout. Mix well. Paint two generous coats of paint, allowing each layer to dry before adding the next. Once the two layers are dry, LIGHTLY sand the entire egg. Wipe away dust with a damp cloth. I repeated this process until I had 6 coats of paint.

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Once the egg was completely dry I was able to draw on the egg with chalk. Most colors rubbed away easily, however a few needed a damp cloth to be removed. Plain black store bought chalkboard paint would also make for dramatic eggs.

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I used a miniature grapevine wreath (sold in a bundle at the craft store) and a little bit of wooden green grass to display the eggs.

Egg Shaped Sidewalk Chalk

March 12, 2007

Just in time for Spring—-egg shaped chalk. 

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These were so easy to make.  You will need:

  • Plaster of Paris
  • Tempera Paint
  • Petroleum Jelly
  • plastic Easter eggs
  • disposable cups
  • disposable spoons or wooden craft sticks
  • egg carton

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Take petroleum jelly and liberally coat the insides of the eggs and then place in the egg carton.  Mix 1/2 cup Plaster of Paris with 1/4 cup water and stir well.  Mix in enough liquid tempera paint to get your desired color.  We added about a teaspoon or so.  You can also use powdered tempera paint (start with about 1 tablespoon and go from there). We mixed up a blue batch, poured it into the eggs then immediatley mixed up a pink batch.

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Pour mixture into egg halves.  This amount makes about 1 1/2 eggs.  We used the 1/2 to make  two colored eggs. DO NOT pour extra plaster down your sink drain –I tell you this is a no no. Throw it in the trash!

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Allow this mixture to set about 5 minutes—just until thick enough to put the egg halves together.  Once together, hold tightly and carefully  give egg a good shake and a firm tap on a hard surface  to allow plaster to form to the egg and the halves to come together.

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Allow eggs to harden overnight.  We couldn’t wait (patience issues) and rushed ours  allowing only about 3 hours (this is overnight in child time isn’t it?) to dry.  To remove them from the plastic an adult must use a knife to work the halves apart. I would like to make a few of these to put back into plastic eggs once first removed and dry to hide on our egg hunt.  I think gray ones would make cute favors for a dinosaur party.

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Chalk On!!

Beadies

February 26, 2007

My boys used to be addicted to this beading craft. Their backpacks were adorned with lizards, frogs, Pokemon and more. Every zipper pull and clip, bore a beadie. We haven’t visited this craft for years. When I mentioned blogging about beadies I thought I would be greeted with groans but to my amazement they each enthusiastically started beading.

First you will need a pattern. There are thousands out there. We like Making Friends, Margo’s Beadie Critter Collection, Evelyn’s Beadie Page and Jason’s Beadie Page. The pattern you choose will tell you the amount and color of pony beads you will need and the length of cord. Most patterns will call for satin cord. We find that plastic lacing cord is much easier to work with. The stiffness of the cord makes it easy to thread the beads—no need for a needle. We choose clear cord instead of colored because it works for every project.

First you will divide your cord in half and attach a lanyard clip with a half hitch knot .

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Beads are threaded on one side of the cord in color order according to your pattern

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The other side of the cord is threaded back through all of the beads. You continue through the pattern in this fashion.

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We made this leprechaun and leprechaun hat

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and looking forward to Easter this bunny and chick.

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If you have used the plastic lacing cord and have trouble getting your beadie to lay flat when finished, you can take it and drop it in boiling water for about one minute. Remove from the water and place on a towel. Press your beadie with another towel, adjusting and flattening. Use caution– it will be hot when it first comes out of the water (especially the metal clip).

Happy beading!